Saturday, July 2, 2016

Raphael and Influence during the Renaissance

Agostino dei Musi after Raphael
Group of figures from The School of Athens
early 16th century
engraving
Victoria & Albert Museum

Peter Paul Rubens after Raphael
Figure from The Fire in the Borgo
17th century
drawing
British Museum

Marcantonio Raimondi after Raphael
Venus extracting a thorn from her foot
early 16th century
engraving
Victoria & Albert Museum

Marcantonio Raimondi after Raphael
Raphael's Dream
early 16th century
engraving
Victoria & Albert Museum

Marcantonio Raimondi after Raphael
David with the Head of Goliath
early 16th century
engraving
Victoria & Albert Museum

Anonymous print-maker after Raphael
Sibyl reading with Torch-bearer
ca. 1520-40
engraving
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Giacomo Cavedone after Raphael
Combating Figures
17th century
drawing
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Raphael after Michelangelo
Statue of David from the back
ca. 1505-08
drawing
British Museum

Michelangelo completed his statue of David in 1504. It became immediately famous, as it has remained ever since, and the young Raphael drew it from several angles. Raphael's intention was NOT to render any kind of accurate reproduction, but to assimilate this new work to his own purposes  "he modified the proportions of the head and the hands and altered the pose so as to give more flowing elegance to the line." 

Raphael after Michelangelo
Figure study after the statue of David
ca. 1505-08
drawing
British Museum

Raphael
Study for the Disputa
ca. 1508-09
drawing
British Museum

Raphael
Study for the Entombment
ca. 1506
drawing
British Museum

attributed to Raphael
Studies of the Belvedere Torso
early 16th centyrt
drawing
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Raphael
Hercules overpowering a lion
early 16th century
drawing
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Raphael
Studies
early 16th century
drawing
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford