Tuesday, August 2, 2022

Gianlorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) - Faces in Three Dimensions

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust of Monsignor Carlo Antonio dal Pozzo
1620
marble
Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Posthumous Bust of Pope Paul V Borghese
1621
marble
(commissioned by Cardinal Scipione Borghese)
Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Anonymous copyist after Gianlorenzo Bernini
Head of Proserpina
ca. 1770-1800
marble
(adaptation of original, 1621-22)
Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Posthumous Bust of Monsignor Francesco Barberini
ca. 1623
marble
(uncle of Pope Urban VIII Barberini)
National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust of Cardinal Scipione Borghese
1632
marble
Galleria Borghese, Rome

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust of Thomas Baker
ca. 1638
marble
Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Head of Medusa
ca. 1638-48
marble
Musei Capitolini, Rome

Anonymous copyist after Gianlorenzo Bernini
Head of Medusa
ca. 1775-1800
marble
(adaptation of original, ca. 1638-48)
Hermitage, Saint Petersburg

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust of Francesco I d'Este
1650-51
marble
Galleria Estense, Modena

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust of Pope Alexander VII Chigi
ca. 1657
bronze
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust of Louis XIV
1665
marble
(carved in Paris)
Ch√Ęteau de Versailles

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust Portrait of a Gentleman
ca. 1670-75
marble
Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Gianlorenzo Bernini
Bust of the Savior
ca. 1679
marble
(commissioned in Rome by Queen Christina)
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia

workshop of Gianlorenzo Bernini
Portrait Head of Gianlorenzo Bernini
ca. 1680-90
terracotta
Hermitage, Saint Petersburg

Bernardo Fioriti
Bust of Gianlorenzo Bernini
ca. 1660
marble
Philadelphia Museum of Art

"Despite the economic depression we have just been describing, the art of the High Baroque reached its culmination in the course of the new pontificate [that of Alexander VII Chigi, reigned 1655-1667].  It was during the 1660s that some of the greatest and most significant monuments of the Roman Baroque were built, and painting and sculpture flourished at least as vigorously as they had done under Urban VIII [reigned 1623-1644].  What produced this flowering is not altogether clear.  . . .  Immeasurably important was the presence in Rome of a genius of the calibre of Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who was able to combine supreme creative gifts with an ability to organise a large studio and to direct and train a team of artists.  The role that Bernini played in Rome would become fully apparent after his death in 1680, when many artists were left without the firm and steady guidance he had so long provided." 

– Torgil Magnuson, Rome in the Age of Bernini (Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International, 1982)